Posted by: towmasters | March 12, 2009

Treating Hypothermia: 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit / 37 degrees Celsius or bust!

The sun is getting higher in the sky and the days, while still somewhat chilly at times, are gradually getting longer and warmer. Spring is definitely knocking on the door, unless you’re in the highest of latitudes. But the water is still very cold at the 39-44°N East Coast mid-latitudes that I generally work within. Lethally cold, in fact. How about a nice 37°F ice cream headache at the Casco Bay weather buoy near Portland, Me.? The Delaware Bay weather buoy, located 26 NM southeast of Cape May, N.J., checks in at a relatively balmy 41°F this morning. This isn’t exactly Speedo weather, so here’s some excellent information on treating hypothermia if someone goes for an unanticipated swim call. Don’t forget: the wearing of a life jacket can mean the difference between treating a crewman for hypothermia or having to perform the unpleasant task of notifying their next-of-kin of his or her untimely demise. This post should be read, if you didn’t catch it earlier, in conjunction with the Life Jackets & The Cold Water Boot Camp post from back in January, along with Capt. Bill Brucato’s (NY Tugmaster’s Weblog) thoughful comments on it.

Brought to you by Mad Mariner via the most-excellent and newly-redesigned Casco Bay Boaters Blog.

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Responses

  1. Hello!
    Very Interesting post! Thank you for such interesting resource!
    PS: Sorry for my bad english, I’v just started to learn this language 😉
    See you!
    Your, Raiul Baztepo


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